Social marketing: Changing public behaviour through communications

SimonCommunications, General4 Comments

Last month I posted about social marketing and how I see it will become increasingly important in public sector communications during 2010.

Later this month Charity Comms is running a social marketing conference aimed at helping charity communicators learn more about social marketing and how to apply it in their organisations.

The conference takes place in London on 27 January – full details here.

Here’s a summary of what the day’s about:

Changing the way people think and behave to deliver your organisation’s mission. It’s a daunting task. CharityComms’ latest conference will equip you with the essential tools and knowledge your organisation needs to do it successfully.

Whether it’s encouraging people to live more healthily or pushing them to save the environment, getting people to change the way they think and act is a key goal for many charities.

Changing people’s behaviour can be difficult. But it’s not impossible. Using thinking from commercial and government marketing, charities all over the UK are using social marketing to change people’s thinking and make them act differently.

This conference is for policy officers, media teams, campaign and marketing managers. We will show you how to make social marketing work for your organisation. Using real life examples, we’ll show you how to develop, deliver and evaluate an effective social marketing campaign.

On the agenda:

  • Getting the research stage of your campaign right
  • How to get an insight into the mind of your target audience
  • Involving the people you want to reach in your campaign
  • Delivering and evaluating your campaign

Looking at the range of speakers and topics covered, it looks like much of the day would be relevant to public sector communicators as well as those working in charities if you were looking for an introduction to social marketing.

4 Comments on “Social marketing: Changing public behaviour through communications”

  1. Kevin Campbell-Wright

    I’d be interested to see how the same theories could be applied to social issues – for example, I’ve worked in areas where the real deprivation is in people’s minds – and you have those “Be proud to live where you do” campaigns…could the same behaviour change tactics be applied to this? I don’t see why not…

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